Tag Archives: utilities

Utility bills

What is a utility bill?

Utility bills are a regular occurrence in most people’s lives – and can add up hundreds of dollars a month in expenses! Generally, you’ll get utility bills for things like electricity, gas, and water (typically each month) to your home or business. We’ll break down what utility bills you’re likely receiving, what makes up the final utility bill you see at the end of each billing cycle, and ways to save on your utility bills in the future.

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solar developers

Solar developers: what you need to know

In 2021, the U.S. installed more solar than ever before – with one out of every 600 U.S. homeowners installing solar each quarter! And impressively, more than half of those additions came from utility-scale projects. The companies that build these projects aren’t the same type of installers you receive quotes from on EnergySage – while they technically install projects like residential solar companies, we in the industry most often refer to them as solar developers.

In this article, we’ll give you a quick overview of solar developers, the role they play in the solar industry, and highlight some of the top solar developers today.

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graph showing more expensive electricity during specific times

What is critical peak pricing?

As we continue to move towards a more modern grid–and a more educated electricity user!–utilities across the country are beginning to introduce electricity rates that better align the price we pay for electricity with the cost of producing it by varying the price of electricity based on the time it’s consumed. Critical peak pricing (CPP) is one such time varying rate plan that charges more for electricity during certain periods of peak demand, but also allows you to lower electricity spending–and even receive bill credits–by reducing usage during these times. 

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off grid solar

Off grid solar systems: How to go off the grid with solar

People say all the time that they want to get off the grid. Beyond just meaning getting away from it all for a while, getting off the grid has a specific technical meaning with regards to your relationship to your utility and how you get your power. So, what exactly does it mean to go off the grid? If you’re going off-grid, there are tons of options to consider when it comes to batteries, inverters, panels, mounting systems, and solar charge controllers. Each product is different and you can customize your kit in a countless number of ways, which is why it is vital to know exactly what you’re looking for and why. Generally, an off grid solar system has the following parts:

  1. Solar panels 
  2. Solar inverters
  3. Wiring/cables
  4. Mounting equipment 
  5. Charge controller
  6. Batteries 
  7. Safety equipment (safety disconnects, grounding equipment, surge protection)
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solar batteries

Bring your own battery programs: what you need to know in 2021

As solar batteries become more and more popular, individual utilities are beginning to offer rebate and incentive programs to make the economics of adding storage to your solar panel system more favorable. Given that solar batteries are a new product, utilities have begun experimenting with new program designs specific to solar batteries. One of the newest, increasingly common program types is a bring your own battery, or bring your own device, program.

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what appliances use the most energy

What appliances use the most energy?

Not all appliances are made equal. Although every appliance in your home consumes energy, utilizing each one will have a different impact on your monthly electricity bill. Understanding which of your appliances use the most energy, as well as when they’re pulling power from the grid, can help you save substantially on your monthly utility bills.

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feed in tariff

Feed-in tariffs: a primer on feed-in tariffs for solar

There are a number of financial incentives offered to property owners going solar. From rebates to tax incentives and net metering policies, there are many policies that bring down the cost of installing solar panels on your house. One such policy is the feed-in tariff, which, when designed properly, can provide substantial financial benefits to solar customers.

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